Protecting Oregon from Dirty Diesel

Oregon has a diesel problem.

Diesel exhaust in Oregon…
  • causes up to 460 premature deaths each year;
  • causes up to $274 million in climate damage annually in Oregon;
  • costs our people as much as $3.5 billion a year in health harm and lost productivity.

But the biggest problem is this: Oregon is ignoring the solution. 

New engine technology can make heavy duty trucks, construction equipment and other diesel engines run with 90% less pollution, virtually eliminating cancer risk. It’s a great investment: diesel engine upgrades can deliver $17 in health benefits for every dollar invested.

And yet Oregon has…
  • not funded diesel engine upgrades since 2007-09.
  • eliminated a tax credit program in 2012.
  • cut funding for upgrading school buses, leaving thousands of dirty buses on the road and missing a goal to upgrade the entire fleet by 2017.
  • invested only 5% of the funds Washington have dedicated to diesel cleanup since 2002.

Now is the time for Oregon to invest in cleaning up deadly diesel pollution.

Blue ArrowTell your lawmakers it’s time to save lives and invest in solving our diesel problem

 

 

 

 

 

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14 Replies to "Protecting Oregon from Dirty Diesel"

  • Frank Peters
    May 23, 2016 (4:30 pm)
    Reply

    Thanks for getting the word out about diesel.

  • Susan Morre
    May 24, 2016 (4:06 pm)
    Reply

    The DEQ has announced it will do unannounced air quality testing for about 300 Oregon businesses that have emissions permits for heavy metals, but it excluded Hollingsworth & Vose (H&V) in Corvallis from that list. Despite sending emails and posting on the Governor’s website, several Corvallis citizens are not receiving any response from the DEQ or Governor Kate Brown to our concerns about the heavy metals and fine particulate emissions coming from this industrial glass factory on the Willamette River just south of downtown Corvallis. The DEQ is aware that the H&V glass plant has been operating under the wrong class of permit – a permit which expired in 2008 – and they are emitting a much higher level of pollutants than their expired permit allows – yet H&V was excluded from the list of sites that will have unannounced air monitoring. Can you please help us bring this matter to the attention of Governor Brown and get some action from the DEQ?

    Thank you very much.

    • Jen Coleman
      May 27, 2016 (2:59 pm)
      Reply

      Thanks for your comment, Susan. There is a meeting of the governor’s environmental justice task force in Hood River next week, and I will be sure to raise the question.

  • Christine Rapoza
    May 26, 2016 (3:06 pm)
    Reply

    The air traffic, including chem trails that streak over our skies even in the evenings, is another high pollution contributor. It’s time the air above us that airplanes are polluting and dumping on us (think about what they dump from their potties in the air) meet with better regulations.


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