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You are here: Home Resources Living Green Living Green At Home Toxic Reduction Tips for Your School, Child Care or Home

Toxic Reduction Tips for Your School, Child Care or Home

Would you like to know more about how  to be Eco-Healthy? Here you will find useful information and tips on everything from pesticide-free pest control to avoiding toxic flame retardants.

Regulation fact sheets from seven Eco-Healthy Child Care pilot states:

California

Colorado

Florida

Massachusetts

Maine

North Carolina

Washington

These resources have also been translated into Russian, Spanish, and Traditional Chinese:

Wallet Card Guides

 

Click on any of these topics to find out more:

Pest Prevention

Air Quality

Radon

Household Chemicals

Lead

Furniture and Carpets

Mercury

Art Supplies

Plastics and Plastic Toys

Healthy Eating

Playground Equipment

 

Pest Prevention

Pesticides.gifChemical pesticides designed to kill plants, insects and other critters are also dangerous to human health. Many pesticides for use in homes are associated with cancer, birth defects, hormone disruption and nervous system problems.

Eco-Healthy Tip: Pesticides (in PDF format for download)

Guide to Safer Pest Management

 

 

Safer Pest Control Wallet Guide

 

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Air Quality

Air Quality
asthma inhaler

Air quality indoors is often significantly worse than outdoors. Because the average American spends 90 percent of their time indoors, cleaner air can make a big difference for health today and in the future. 

Eco-Healthy Tip: Air Quality (download fact sheet in PDF format

Other resources:

Radon

Radon house

Radon is a natural gas that you can’t see, smell, or taste. Radon gets into a building by moving up through the ground and then through cracks and holes in the foundation. Buildings can trap radon, which can lead to harmful concentrations indoors.

 

Get our fact sheet on radon.

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Household Chemicals

household chemicalsThe average home uses about 60 toxic chemicals in household products. You can reduce that number -- and the health threats from exposure -- by choosing safer alternatives to clean your home.  

Lead

Lead.gifUntil the late 1970s, lead was a common additive in house paint, gasoline and plumbing fixtures. Today, we know that even low exposures to lead can cause problems for the nervous system, kidneys, blood, and mental and physical development. Though today's health standards are stronger, lead from decades ago remains in our homes and environment.

Eco-Healthy Tip: Lead (in PDF format for download)

Other resources:

Mercury

Mercury ThermometerExposure to mercury can damage the nervous system, causing problems with thinking, memory, mood, motor skills and more. Exposure can come from breaking a mercury-containing household product. But a more toxic form, methylmercury, gets into our food chain through burning coal, manufacturing products and improper disposal of products containing mercury.

Eco-Healthy Tip: Lead (in PDF format for download)

Furniture and Flooring

Furniture.gifWhen you're ready to buy new home furnishing and carpets, there are choices you can make to avoid bringing toxic chemicals into your home. There are also signs of wear to watch out for in existing products or when you buy second-hand.

Eco-Healthy Tip: Furniture and Carpets (in PDF format for download)

Art Supplies

Eco-Healthy Tip: Art Supplies (in PDF format for download)

Art SuppliesThe good news about art supplies is that many products are certified by the Art & Creative Materials Institute as non-toxic and safe for use by children. But take caution when choosing glue, paint, clay, glaze, solvents and other supplies; many contain hazards for growing children.

Plastics and Plastic Toys

Eco-Healthy Tip: Plastics and Plastic Toys (in PDF format for download)

Plastic.gif

Science continues to reveal ways that common plastics expose people to the chemicals used in their manufacture. Learn more about how to avoid using plastics in ways that risks exposure.

Healthy Eating

Apple in hand

Food containers, food additives and preservatives, pesticides and other pollutants in food can be a source of exposure that puts your family's health at risk. Learn more about how to choose safer food, prepare it in a healthy way and serve it in healthy packaging.
Get tips on healthy food for healthy celebrations and easy ways to improve nutrition 

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Playground Equipment

Eco-Healthy Tip: Treated Playground Equipment (in PDF format for download)

treated wood playground From the 1970's until 2003, wood for outdoor use (on playgrounds, decks, picnic benches) was pressure-treated with a preservative containing toxic arsenic. Arsenic exposure is linked to nerve damage, immune diseases, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, changes in hormone function and cancer. The good news is that covering the wood with paint or sealant can reduce exposure.

 Commit to changes with our Eco-Healthy Family Pledge

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