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Discharge Petition for BPA-Free Baby Bill Falls Short

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SB695 comfortably passed Senate, remains stalled in House but still has life

“It’s disappointing that a bill which guarantees all baby bottles, sippy cups and sports water bottles sold in Oregon are BPA free and has the support of 75% of Oregonians polled is having such a hard time passing,” said Renee Hackenmiller-Paradis, PhD, MPH, Oregon Environmental Council. “With only weeks left in the legislative session, it is crucial that our representatives step up and restore consumer confidence in the marketplace in the name of healthier homes and healthier babies."

Salem, OR Jun 01, 2011

Senate Bill 695, a bipartisan-sponsored BPA-Free Baby Bill aimed at protecting Oregon’s children from toxic chemicals, took a step backwards today after Rep. Ben Cannon’s discharge petition failed to receive the required 31 of 60 signatures from House of Representative members.


“It’s disappointing that a bill which guarantees all baby bottles, sippy cups and sports water bottles sold in Oregon are BPA free and has the support of 75% of Oregonians polled is having such a hard time passing,” said Renee Hackenmiller-Paradis, PhD, MPH, Oregon Environmental Council. “With only weeks left in the legislative session, it is crucial that our representatives step up and restore consumer confidence in the marketplace in the name of healthier homes and healthier babies."


Rep. Cannon’s discharge petition would have brought SB 695 to the House Floor for a vote if it had received a minimum of 31 signatures. The bill now remains stalled in the House committee after handily passing the Senate, although Rep. Cannon has re-introduced the legislation in the form of a new priority bill that is anticipated to gain more traction than the discharge petition.


As proposed, SB695 would be the first BPA-Free bill in the nation that would develop a trustworthy labeling system to identify BPA-free canned foods. Similar measures banning BPA in children’s products have passed in nine states, including Washington, as well as China and Malaysia. 

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